by ONINO HANZO

In an age when special effects and creatures scene on the big screen are often assumed to be purely digital in creation, it’s important to remember that the craftsmanship of traditional sculpting and practical effects work is still alive and well, and sneaking up behind you with enormous claws and teeth. Monsterpalooza 2019, held at the Pasadena Convention Center from April 12 to 14, housed not only our own fantastic Phantasmic booth, but also hundreds of vendors, artisans, actors and more across special effects work, sculpting and illustration.

A celebration of all things creepy, crawly, scaly, and city-smashing, Monsterpalooza is one of the favorite conventions of director Guillermo del Toro and housed some exemplary statues and garage kits. With a line going down the block for hopefuls trying to get tickets, the convention was jammed pack. Phantasmic was on the show floor with art books, figurines, and more for all.

dom qwek monsterpalooza 2019

Dom Qwek displayed his ornate Necro Skull, a an ornate combination of intricate design and organic form with an inorganic metallic sheen. Simon Lee’s The Impermanence, a centipede-like demon-priest with a gaping maw and grotesque extended limbs looked like it walked straight out of the game Sekiro and into our plane of existence.  Phantasmic will also be appearing at the upcoming Son of Monsterpalooza convention, so keep an eye out for the dates.



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