MORI BUILDING DIGITAL ART MUSEUM:EPSON TEAMLAB BORDERLESS

by Mariko Oka

The world’s first digital art museum in Tokyo
Japanese art collective teamLab has opened a 10,000 sqm space museum packed with 50 of its technicolour digital artworks in Odaiba, Tokyo. It is officially known as the Mori Building Digital Art Museum. The museum features an overwhelming sense of scale and diverse spatial composition.
Some 520 computers and 470 projectors power the digital artworks, which completely transform their physical space using animated graphics, colour and light.
Artworks are spread across the museum’s five zones (Borderless World, Athletics Forest, Future Park, Forest of Lamps, and EN Tea House) and are designed to dissolve the boundary between visitor and artwork through interaction.
‘Artworks move out of the rooms freely, form connections and relationships with people, communicate with other works, influence and sometimes intermingle with each other.’              
 -teamLab Borderless
https://youtu.be/9jOFlhMk2K0


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